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Vaccinations Program 

As responsible pet owners, we know you would like to ensure that your pet is vaccinated against preventable diseases. Both cats and dogs can catch diseases which may in the worst cases be fatal, even with supportive therapy. The benefits of annual vaccinations and their complementary health check far outweigh the potential costs and consequences of any disease that may be preventable.

Dog Vaccination

Dogs may pick up infectious diseases directly from other dogs, objects that they come into contact with or on the ground in the outside environment. Dogs are more likely to pick up diseases if they are together in large numbers, i.e. going to the kennels, dog training classes, even somewhere a lot of dogs are walked like the local park. One preventable disease, Leptosporosis, can even be passed on from your dog to you, with serious health consequences. Your dog may not meet many other dogs, but these diseases can be carried on items of your clothing or shoes without you knowing. 
Puppy Vaccination - Puppies are usually vaccinated for the first time from 8 weeks old, with the second dose being given from 10 weeks old. An adult dog whose vaccinations have lapsed would have two vaccinations 2 weeks apart. We would recommend waiting 10 days after the second vaccination before walking your dog outside. 
Why your dog needs booster vaccinations - Primary pet vaccinations do not cover your animal for the rest of their life, so annual booster vaccinations are required for continued protection. The annual health check that is included with the vaccination can sometimes highlight areas of concern with your pet, or may simply reassure you of your pets good health. Early detection of some diseases may bring benefits and a quick check to ensure your pets microchip is working can bring peace of mind.   

Cat Vaccinations

There are a number of highly infectious and potentially fatal diseases which can affect your cat. If your cat lives in a multi-pet environment they may be at particular risk. For many conditions there is a simple protection in the form of pet vaccinations. Ensuring that your cat receives a course of pet vaccinations and then receives booster jabs is important if you want to keep your cat fit and healthy for life.

  • Kitten vaccinations - Kittens are usually vaccinated from 9 weeks old, with the second dose being given at 12 weeks old. An adult cat whose vaccinations have lapsed would have two vaccinations 3 weeks apart. We would recommend waiting 10-14 days after the second vaccination before allowing your cat outside. 
  • Why you cat needs booster vaccinations - Primary pet vaccinations do not cover your animal for the rest of their life, so annual booster vaccinations are required for continued protection. The annual health check that is included with the vaccination can sometimes highlight areas of concern with your pet, or may simply reassure you of your pets good health. Early detection of some diseases may bring benefits and a quick check to ensure your pets microchip is working can bring peace of mind.   

Rabbit Vaccinations

It is important to protect your rabbit against Myxomatosis and Viral Haemorrhagic Disease, this can now be done with a new annual booster.  Rabbits can be vaccinated at 5 weeks of age with the new vaccine, with the onset of immunity being 3 weeks.  The combined vaccine is injected under your rabbit's skin in order to stimulate immunity against both viruses.

  • Myxomatosis - This virus is spread by biting insects such as fleas and mosquitoes.  It is also spread via direct contact with infected rabbits.  This virus is not only seen in wild rabbits but also in domesticated rabbits.  Signs of the disease are swelling around the eyes and genital area, discharge from the eyes which often remain shut.  An infected rabbit is often slow in movement and may have breathing problems.  For those rabbits that are not vaccinated and contract the virus the outcome is poor and euthanasia is the kindest form of treatment.
  • VHD - Viral Haemorrhagic Disease - This disease is caused by a calicivirus which is highly infectious.  It can be spread via direct contact and also indirect contact such as inanimate objects (clothing, bedding and bowls).  Signs of the disease can include nose bleeds, fits and difficulty breathing but usually the only sign is sudden death of the rabbit.  Unfortunately for a rabbit with this disease the outcome is poor and no treatment available.